Coronavirus

4:13 PM, Feb 27, 2020

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At least 250,000 people worldwide have died of the coronavirus

At least 250,000 people worldwide have died of the coronavirus
Posted at 8:42 AM, May 05, 2020
and last updated 2020-05-05 08:42:20-04

Worldwide, there have been more than 250,000 deaths linked to the novel coronavirus since the outbreak began in China late last year, according to a database kept by Johns Hopkins.

Around the world, more than 3 million people have contracted COVID-19.

Researchers suggest that the number of confirmed cases and deaths remain vastly underreported, due to lack of test kits and the still unknown nature of the virus.

The United States remains the country with the most confirmed cases and deaths linked to the virus. The U.S. has confirmed 1.1 million cases of the virus since February, and more than 68,000 people have died of the virus.

Spain and Italy are the only other countries with more than 200,000 cases of the virus. The United Kingdom, with 190,000 cases, should surpass that mark in the coming days.

While numbers have begun to stabilize in the New York area in recent weeks, the city still remains the epicenter of the outbreak in the United States. The city itself accounts for 175,000 cases of the virus and more than 19,000 deaths.

Cases in Cook County, Illinois — the county that includes Chicago — have steadily risen in recent weeks. The county now ranks second across the country with more than 43,000 confirmed cases of the virus and more than 1,800 deaths.

Other hotspots outside of New York City include Detroit (17,000 cases and 1,900 deaths in Wayne County), Los Angeles (26,000 confirmed cases and 1,200 deaths) and Philadelphia (16,000 confirmed cases and 900 deaths).

Around the world, at least 1.1 million people are confirmed to have recovered from the virus. Researchers also believe this figure is vastly undervalued, as many people who contract the coronavirus experience very mild symptoms. There is also mounting evidence that the virus was spread internationally earlier than initially thought.