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Wide-Open race for a state house seat

Posted: 7:51 PM, Aug 01, 2016
Updated: 2016-08-02 12:14:37Z

For the last few weeks Gloria Al-Asfoor has watched candidates walk up and down West Morrel street in Jackson.

"I have to walk my dogs and there's Griffin, and Brooks, and Alexander and you name it," Gloria Al-Asfoor said.

Sign after sign, "a lot of people running," Al-Asfoor said. All of those candidates vying for her vote.

But since it's a crowded race for the 64th seat she doesn't know who has her vote.

"We elect and we elect and like everywhere, promises are made," said Al-Asfoor.

Some of those candidates making promises to Gloria are the three republicans hoping to keep the seat within the party.

"I know what people deserve and people deserve a candidate that's accessible," said candidate Julie Alexander.

Jackson County commissioner Julie Alexander believes her experience working within the county as a teacher and farmer is what Jackson needs as it's voice.

"It's about asking the right questions so that you can continue to make wise decisions," Alexander said. "I've handled a lot of difficult budget cuts, budget issues."

She told us the way she's handled those situations is why Earl For the last few weeks Gloria Al-Asfoor has watched candidates walk up and down West Morrel street in Jackson.

"I have to walk my dogs and there's Griffin, and Brooks, and Alexander and you name it," Gloria Al-Asfoor said.

Sign after sign, "a lot of people running," Al-Asfoor said. All of those candidates vying for her vote.

But since it's a crowded race for the 64th seat she doesn't know who has her vote.

"We elect and we elect and like everywhere, promises are made," said Al-Asfoor.

Some of those candidates making promises to Gloria are the three republicans hoping to keep the seat within the party.

"I know what people deserve and people deserve a candidate that's accessible," said candidate Julie Alexander.

Jackson County commissioner Julie Alexander believes her experience working within the county as a teacher and farmer is what Jackson needs as it's voice.

"It's about asking the right questions so that you can continue to make wise decisions," Alexander said. "I've handled a lot of difficult budget cuts, budget issues."

She told us the way she's handled those situations is why Earl Poleski, who currently holds the seat, is supporting her.

John Griffin has support from two former representatives his dad, Michael J. Griffin, and brother, Martin J. Griffin, both held the 64th seat. John Griffin believes because of that and his experience with public policy is why he's the guy for the job.

"I thought state representative and Lansing really they really need some people who know what's going on," Griffin said. "I've got a great reputation here and up in Lansing. I think I'll go to work for the people."

Businessman Phil Tripp says the seat needs fresh air and that as a normal citizen without political experience is the person that will work for the people.

"If you want to change the world, change your neighborhood. I know how to make decisions. I know how to," Tripp said.

Tripp believes his experience as a local business owner, everything he's experienced will help, "we've gone through some tough economic times and we had to make decisions. And i want to take that to Lansing."

All three hoping voters like Gloria Al-Asfoor will send them to Lansing and to keep Jackson's coined "Birth Place of the Republican Party" seat red.