MSU discovers male birth control is a possibility

MSU's Animal Science department has come up with a permanent form of male birth control that doesn't involve surgery.

They have found a way to turn off the gene that controls sperm production. Chen Chen, a professor at MSU discovered that the removal of a specific gene can make male mice sterile.

"We have found this protein is essential for sperm production and we are trying to think of a way to block this protein or this enzyme in order to block spermatogenesis and sperm production," said Chen.

If turned into a drug, the pill would be similar to female birth control where the contraceptive could stop being taken without permanent side effects.

"So we knocked out this gene out in every single cell and the mice live normally and happily and behavioral wise is normal and even the mating behavior for these mice are normal," said Chen.

We asked various men around MSU's campus if this is an option they would try in the future.

"Oh I'd absolutely take that. So much more convenient. You don't have to rely on anybody else to make sure they are doing it. The responsibility is on you. It would be something that later on in life you don't have to worry about getting the vasectomy", said Scott Riley.

Professor Chen is still working on this breakthrough and feels that it's going to change the future of contraception for men.